A comparison of methods to detect postural transitions using a single tri-axial accelerometer

Alan Godfrey, Gillian Barry, John Mathers, Lynn Rochester

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two algorithms for evaluating postural transitions (PTs) in cohorts of 40 healthy younger and 40 older adults are described and evaluated. The time of sit-to-stand (SiSt) and stand-to-sit (StSi) transitions and their duration were measured with two tri-axial accelerometers, one on the chest and one on the lower back. Each algorithm was optimized for these sensor placements. The first algorithm for sensor placement on the chest used a scalar product and vertical velocity estimates. The second algorithm for sensor placement on the lower back used a vector magnitude and a discrete wavelet transform. Both algorithms performed excellently in PT classification for younger and older adults (>86%). However, the chest based sensor and algorithm were better for estimating transition duration (TD) with ICCs to video analysis ranging from 0.678 to 0.969.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
PublisherIEEE
Pages6234-7
Number of pages4
Volume2014
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4244-7929-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventEMBC’14 - 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - Illinois, USA
Duration: 26 Jun 2014 → …

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Conference

ConferenceEMBC’14 - 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Period26/06/14 → …

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