A dangerous method? Defending the rise of business law clinics in the UK

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Abstract

In clinical legal education (CLE) circles there is a deep-seated belief that all law school clinics must pursue a social justice agenda by helping the poor. Consequently, clinics which assist businesses who can afford to pay for legal services are often met with disapproval. This may account for the scarcity of publications, especially in the United Kingdom, which explore and reflect on business law clinics. Yet these clinics do exist, and they are growing in number and scope. Using the Business & Commercial firms at Northumbria University’s Student Law Office as a case study, this paper defends the right of business law clinics to be part of the CLE movement. First, it argues that business law clinics allow law students to pursue a diverse and relevant education. Secondly, it queries why these clinics cannot fulfil a (reconceptualised) social justice mission.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-175
JournalThe Law Teacher
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Feb 2015

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