A Review of Antimicrobial Peptides and Their Therapeutic Potential as Anti-Infective Drugs

Y. Jerold Gordon, Eric Romanowski, Alison McDermott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

495 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an essential part of innate immunity that evolved in most living organisms over 2.6 billion years to combat microbial challenge. These small cationic peptides are multifunctional as effectors of innate immunity on skin and mucosal surfaces and have demonstrated direct antimicrobial activity against various bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review summarizes their progress to date as commercial antimicrobial drugs for topical and systemic indications. Methods: Literature review. Results: Despite numerous clinical trials, no modified AMP has obtained Food & Drug Administration approval yet for any topical or systemic medical indications. Conclusions: While AMPs are recognized as essential components of natural host innate immunity against microbial challenge, their usefulness as a new class of antimicrobial drugs still remains to be proven.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)505-515
JournalCurrent Eye Research
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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