A Systematic Review Comparing the Play Profiles of Children with Special Health Care Needs with Typically Developing Children

Nyaradzai Munambah*, Reinie Cordier, Renée Speyer, Sivuyisiwe Toto, Elelwani L. Ramugondo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. Although play has been used as a means to meet therapeutic goals by health care practitioners for a long time, there is a need to continuously review its conceptualisation and use in everyday practice to promote evidence-based practice. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the evidence on how the play of children with Special Health Care Needs (SHCN) is similar or different to that of typically developing children. Methods. Guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement, we conducted a comprehensive review across five electronic databases for all studies that compared how the play of children with SHCN was similar or different to that of typically developing children. Data were extracted from the included studies, and methodological quality was assessed. Results. Eighteen studies met eligibility criteria. All the studies in this review were at risk of bias due to the study design. There was great variation in sample sizes, ranging between five and 112 participants in the diagnostic groups and five and 546 participants in control groups (typically developing children). The included studies investigated different aspects of play, which made it difficult to synthesise. However, of the 18 studies reviewed, thirteen reported that children with SHCN engage in less play, compared with typically developing children. Conclusions. Evidence supports the assumption that children with SHCN are less playful and spend less time engaging in play compared with typically developing children. This systematic review reveals paucity of research on play for children with several common chronic conditions such as HIV/AIDS, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Future studies need to reduce risks of bias, including the use of appropriate sample sizes, and must provide detailed results after investigating play in children with SHCN.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9582795
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalBiomed Research International
Volume2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Nov 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Systematic Review Comparing the Play Profiles of Children with Special Health Care Needs with Typically Developing Children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this