A visualisation tool to understand disease prevention and control practices of stakeholders working along the poultry supply chain in southern India

Chamithri Greru, Rebekah Thompson, Vasudevan Gowthaman, Saranya Shanmugasundaram, Nagaarjun Ganesan, T. R. Gopala Krishna Murthy, Mahmoud Eltholth, Jennifer Cole, Jyoti Joshi, Ravikiran Runjala, Madhumita Nath, Nagendra R. Hegde, Nicola Williams

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Abstract

In this paper, we show how we developed a visualisation tool to challenge perceived notions about biosecurity on poultry farms. Veterinarians and veterinary public health professionals tend to present biosecurity measures as a universal and cost-effective solution for preventing and controlling diseases on farms. However, we illustrate how biosecurity is an ill-defined term, making it difficult to talk about or apply in practice. As a result, we demonstrate how we moved away from using the term biosecurity in our research by designing a visualisation tool. The tool was to allow us to open up dialogue around disease prevention and control, and make tangible the tacit situated practices of stakeholders working along the poultry supply chain. Our findings show that for those working along the poultry supply chain, the term biosecurity was either consistently open to interpretation, or too rigid to reflect or allow for local variations. We conclude by highlighting how our visualisation tool offers insights into why researchers must move beyond using biosecurity as a term, and instead envisage, design, and develop local solutions to prevent and control diseases on poultry farms.
Original languageEnglish
Article number169
Number of pages10
JournalHumanities and Social Sciences Communications
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 May 2022

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