Acceptability of workplace bullying: A comparative study on six continents

Jacqueline L. Power, Céleste Brotheridge, John Blenkinsopp, Lynn Bowes-Sperry, Nikos Bozionelos, Zoltán Buzády, Aichia Chuang, Dawn Drnevich, Antonio Garzon-Vico, Catherine Leighton, Sergio M. Madero, Wai-ming Mak, Romina Mathew, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Bahaudin G. Mujtaba, Miguel R. Olivas-Lujan, Panagiotis Polycroniou, Christine A. Sprigg, Carolyn Axtell, David HolmanJaime A. Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Anthony Ugochukwu Obiajulu Nnedumm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper is the first to explore the impact of culture on the acceptability of workplace bullying and to do so across a wide range of countries. Physically intimidating bullying is less acceptable than work related bullying both within groups of similar cultures and globally. Cultures with high performance orientation find bullying to be more acceptable while those with high future orientation find bullying to be less acceptable. A high humane orientation is associated with finding work related bullying to be less acceptable. Confucian Asia finds work-related bullying to be more acceptable than the Anglo, Latin America, and Sub-Saharan Africa country clusters and finds physically intimidating bullying to be more acceptable than the Anglo and Latin America country clusters. The differences in the acceptability of bullying with respect to these cultures are partially explained in terms of cultural dimensions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)374-380
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume66
Issue number3
Early online date7 Sep 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Mar 2013

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