Access to pediatric rheumatology care - A major challenge to improving outcome in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Helen Foster*, Tim Rapley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases and is one of the most common chronic rheumatic diseases in children. Improving the outcome for children with JIA remains an important goal, with current management of severe JIA involving increasingly aggressive immunosuppressive agents.

Undoubtedly, improving outcome in JIA depends on the availability of effective treatments, but if a child presents late in their disease course or receives inappropriate treatment or does not have access to treatment at all, then outcome is likely to be suboptimal. There is an increasing body of evidence that many children with JIA have a prolonged interval from disease onset to pediatric rheumatology care, and despite there being no published data from developing countries, anecdotal observations suggest that poor access to optimal care is likely to be a global issue.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2199-2202
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume37
Issue number11
Early online date1 Nov 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

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