Acute effects of active gaming on ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations of 8–11-year-old boys

Susan Allsop, Caroline Dodd-Reynolds, Benjamin Green, Dorothée Debuse, Penny Rumbold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The present study examined the acute effects of active gaming on energy intake (EI) and appetite responses in 8–11 year-old boys in a schoolbased setting. Using a randomised cross-over design, twenty-one boys completed four individual 90-min gaming bouts, each separated by 1 week. The gaming bouts were (1) seated gaming, no food or drink; (2) active gaming, no food or drink; (3) seated gaming with food and drink offered ad libitum; and (4) active gaming with food and drink offered ad libitum. In the two gaming bouts during which foods and drinks were offered, EI was measured. Appetite sensations – hunger, prospective food consumption and fullness – were recorded using visual analogue scales during all gaming bouts at 30-min intervals and at two 15-min intervals post gaming. In the two bouts with food and drink, no significant differences were found in acute EI (MJ) (P=0·238). Significant differences were detected in appetite sensations for hunger, prospective food consumption and fullness between the four gaming bouts at various time points. The relative EI calculated for the two gaming bouts with food and drink (active gaming 1·42 (SEM 0·28) MJ; seated gaming 2·12 (SEM 0·25) MJ) was not statistically different. Acute EI in response to active gaming was no different from seated gaming, and appetite sensations were influenced by whether food was made available during the 90-min gaming bouts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2148-2155
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume114
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Oct 2015

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Acute effects of active gaming on ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations of 8–11-year-old boys'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this