Acute Post-Prandial Cognitive Effects of Brown Seaweed Extract in Humans

Crystal Haskell, Philippa Jackson, Fiona Dodd, Joanne Forster, Jocelyn Bérubé, Carey Levinton, David Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

(Poly)phenols and, specifically, phlorotannins present in brown seaweeds have previously been shown to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, key enzymes involved in the breakdown and intestinal absorption of carbohydrates. Related to this are observations of modulation of post-prandial glycemic response in mice and increased insulin sensitivity in humans when supplemented with seaweed extract. However, no studies to date have explored the effect of seaweed extract on cognition. The current randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel groups study examined the impact of a brown seaweed extract on cognitive function post-prandially in 60 healthy adults (N = 30 per group). Computerized measures of episodic memory, attention and subjective state were completed at baseline and 5 times at 40 min intervals over a 3 h period following lunch, with either seaweed or placebo consumed 30 min prior to lunch. Analysis was conducted with linear mixed models controlling for baseline. Seaweed led to significant improvements to accuracy on digit vigilance (p = 0.035) and choice reaction time (p = 0.043) tasks. These findings provide the first evidence for modulation of cognition with seaweed extract. In order to explore the mechanism underlying these effects, future research should examine effects on cognition in parallel with blood glucose and insulin responses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jan 2018

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