Adapting structuration theory to understand the role of reflexivity: problematization, clinical audit and information systems

Laurence Brooks, Chris Atkinson, David Wainwright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper is an exploratory account of the further development and application of a hybrid framework, StructurANTion, that is based on Structuration Theory and Actor Network Theory (ANT). The use of social theories in general and their use in information systems (IS) research in particular is explored leading to the use of the framework to examine the concept of what are termed humanchine networks in the context of clinical audit, within a healthcare Primary Care Trust (PCT). A particular focus is on the manner in which information systems-based reflexivity contributes to both entrenching a networks’ structurated order as well as contributing to its emancipatory change. The case study compares clinic-centric and patient-centric audit and seeks to further extend the understanding of the role of information and information systems within structurated humanchine activity systems. Conclusions indicate that the use of more socially informed IS methods and approaches can incorporate more emancipatory ideals and lead to greater adoption and usage of more relevant and useful clinical information systems and practices.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-460
JournalInternational Journal of Information Management
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

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