Affect, curiosity, and socialization-related learning: A path analysis of antecedents to job performance

Thomas G. Reio, Jamie L. Callahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the influence of affect, curiosity, and socialization-related learning on job performance, with 233 service industry employees from a diverse variety of occupations completing surveys at their places of work. Both state and trait curiosity and socialization-related learning (learning associated with employee socialization) were hypothesized to mediate the relationship between affect (operationalized as state and trait anxiety and anger) and job performance. Structural equation analyses indicate that the data are consistent with the theoretical models proposed. As expected, anxiety negatively influences curiosity, socialization-related learning, and job performance; conversely, anger positively influences curiosity, socialization-related learning, and job performance. Overall, the findings suggest that affects indeed predict perception of job performance, but through the mediation of curiosity and the learning associated with the socialization process. These results highlight the importance of the complex interplay between affect, curiosity, and learning when thinking about successful employee socialization and best possible job performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-22
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Business and Psychology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004
Externally publishedYes

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