AltitudeOmics: exercise-induced supraspinal fatigue is attenuated in healthy humans after acclimatization to high altitude

Stuart Goodall*, Rosie Twomey, Markus Amann, Emma Ross, Andrew Lovering, Lee Romer, Andrew Subudhi, Robert Roach

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: We asked whether acclimatisation to chronic hypoxia (CH) attenuates the level of supraspinal fatigue that is observed after locomotor exercise in acute hypoxia (AH). Methods: Seven recreationally-active participants performed identical bouts of constant-load cycling (131±39W, 10.1±1.4min) on three occasions: 1) in normoxia (N, PIO2, 147.1mmHg); 2) in AH (FIO2, 0.105; PIO2, 73.8mmHg); 3) after 14 days in CH (5,260m; PIO2, 75.7mmHg). Throughout trials, prefrontal-cortex tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAV) were assessed using near-infrared-spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler sonography. Pre- and post-exercise twitch responses to femoral nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation were obtained to assess neuromuscular and corticospinal function. Results: In AH, prefrontal oxygenation declined at rest (Δ7±5%) and end-exercise (Δ26±13) (P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)875-888
JournalActa Physiologica
Volume210
Issue number4
Early online date22 Jan 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2014

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