An Exploration of Comfort and Discomfort Amongst Children and Young People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Depend on Postural Management Equipment

Elizabeth Lyons, Diana Jones, Veronica Swallow, Colin Chandler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background - The natural response to the intrusive bodily sensation is positional change. This study explored how children and young people (CYP) with intellectual disabilities had their comfort needs met when using adaptive positioning equipment. Methods - Thirteen qualitative case studies were undertaken. A parent, a teacher/key worker and a therapist for each CYP were interviewed, and daily routines were observed, with selective video recording. Single case and cross case analyses were undertaken. Results - Attentive caregivers read the behavioural expressions of the CYP and responded reassuringly, safeguarding them from discomforting experiences. Threats to comfort include the restrictive nature of some equipment accessories, positioning errors and procedural stretching. Conclusions - The same item of equipment can be both comfortable and uncomfortable. Given the social and interactional world in which the CYP live and learn, it is others who must accept responsibility for ensuring their optimal level of comfort.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Early online date13 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Jun 2016

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