An integrated tool to assess the role of new planting in PM10 capture and the human health benefits: A case study in London

Abhishek Tiwary, Danielle Sinnett, Christopher Peachey, Zaid Chalabi, Sotiris Vardoulakis, Tony Fletcher, Giovanni Leonardi, Chris Grundy, Adisa Azapagic, Tony R. Hutchings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

111 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of vegetation in mitigating the effects of PM10 pollution has been highlighted as one potential benefit of urban greenspace. An integrated modelling approach is presented which utilises air dispersion (ADMS-Urban) and particulate interception (UFORE) to predict the PM10 concentrations both before and after greenspace establishment, using a 10 × 10 km area of East London Green Grid (ELGG) as a case study. The corresponding health benefits, in terms of premature mortality and respiratory hospital admissions, as a result of the reduced exposure of the local population are also modelled. PM10 capture from the scenario comprising 75% grassland, 20% sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) and 5% Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) was estimated to be 90.41 t yr−1, equating to 0.009 t ha−1 yr−1 over the whole study area. The human health modelling estimated that 2 deaths and 2 hospital admissions would be averted per year.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2645-2653
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume157
Issue number10
Early online date5 Jun 2009
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Jun 2009

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