An investigation into the use of field methods in the design and evaluation of interactive systems

Kelly Monahan, Mia Lahteenmaki, Sharon McDonald, Gilbert Cockton

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper reports the results of an international web-based survey on the use of field studies in the design and evaluation of interactive systems, which was conducted between December 2006 and February 2007. The results suggest that the advantages and disadvantages of field methods are generally well understood, but guidance is needed in their application and use. Field studies were most frequently used for understanding context, and respondents preferred a more varied approach to method use rather than following a defined methodology such as Contextual Design. Observations were rated as the most effective technique overall, although interviews appeared to be more frequently used. Significant areas of further improvement for field methods were identified as improvements in data collection/analysis tools and improvements in adaptability of methods.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationPeople and Computers: Culture, Creativity, Interaction [Proceedings of HCI 2008, the 22nd British HCI Group Annual Conference, Liverpool John Moores University, 1-5 September 2008]
    EditorsDavid England, Russell Beale, Omar Abuelmaatti
    Place of PublicationSwinton, UK
    PublisherBritish Computer Society
    Pages99-108
    ISBN (Print)978-1-906124-04-5
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008
    EventBCS-HCI '08: Proceedings of the 22nd British HCI Group Annual Conference on People and Computers -
    Duration: 1 Aug 2008 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceBCS-HCI '08: Proceedings of the 22nd British HCI Group Annual Conference on People and Computers
    Period1/08/08 → …

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