Anatomical distribution of musculoskeletal disorders following a road traffic collision in litigants presenting to physiotherapists within a private-clinic in North-East England

Jennifer Sewell, Cheryl Dixon, Rosie Morris, Sam Stuart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction : Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are common following a road traffic collision (RTC) in England. Establishing the anatomical distribution of MSDs following RTC that present to physiotherapists may improve understanding and clinical practice. This study examined anatomical distribution of MSDs that present to physiotherapists within a litigant population following a RTC in England. Methods : A retrospective review of physiotherapy records was conducted at a private practice in North-East England. Data were collected from 2105 patients between January 2014 and December 2015. The primary outcome was anatomical regions with MSDs. Descriptive data is reported. Results : Overall, 90% of patients presented with a neck/upper back disorder, while 52% presented with a lower back disorder. Of the assessed patients, 46% presented with one MSD, 45% presented with two MSDs while 9% presented with ≥3 MSDs. Further analysis showed that those who presented to physiotherapy later and were not motor vehicle occupants (MVOs) were more likely to have upper-limb, lower-limb, or lumbar MSDs. Younger patients, who presented sooner and were non-MVO were more likely to have multiple regions affected by MSDs. Conclusions : This study presents epidemiological evidence that MSDs following a RTC occur primarily in the neck/upper back or lower back regions, and that multiple MSDs are common.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)873-883
Number of pages11
JournalPhysiotherapy Theory and Practice
Volume35
Issue number9
Early online date16 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Anatomical distribution of musculoskeletal disorders following a road traffic collision in litigants presenting to physiotherapists within a private-clinic in North-East England'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this