Are language production problems apparent in adults who no longer meet diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

Paul Engelhardt, Sean Veld, Joel T. Nigg, Fernanda Ferreira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In this study, we examined sentence production in a sample of adults (N = 21) who had had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as children, but as adults no longer met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria (APA, 2000). This “remitted” group was assessed on a sentence production task. On each trial, participants saw two objects and a verb. Their task was to construct a sentence using the objects as arguments of the verb. Results showed more ungrammatical and disfluent utterances with one particular type of verb (i.e., participle). In a second set of analyses, we compared the remitted group to both control participants and a “persistent” group, who had ADHD as children and as adults. Results showed that remitters were more likely to produce ungrammatical utterances and to make repair disfluencies compared to controls, and they patterned more similarly to ADHD participants. Conclusions focus on language output in remitted ADHD, and the role of executive functions in language production.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)275-299
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Are language production problems apparent in adults who no longer meet diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this