“Back off, get your own coffee!” The amount of facilitation during object passing is modulated by object ownership status.

Merryn Constable*, Tim Welsh, Andrew Bayliss, Steven Tipper, Ana Spaniol, Jay Pratt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Humans often sacrifice some of their own sensorimotor comfort, control, and efficiency to promote the comfort, control and efficiency of a co-actor. This study demonstrates that the relationship between the ownership status of an object being passed and the individual’s engaged in the task plays a role in these processes. Across two experiments, participants exhibited facilitatory behavior by orienting the handle of a mug towards their co-actor when they passed the mug across a table. The ownership status of the mug, however, influenced the degree of facilitatory behavior. The handle of the mug was oriented towards the co-actor more when the selfother distinction was large (experimenter’s mug vs. participant’s own mug) compared to small (friend’s mug vs. participant’s
own mug). Thus, individuals promote the efficient movement of
a co-actor, but to a lesser degree when the co-actor will interact
with the individual’s own object than anyone else’s object.
Original languageEnglish
Pages125-125
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 18 Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes
EventPsychonmic Society’s 57th Annual Meeting - Boston, United States
Duration: 17 Nov 201620 Nov 2016

Conference

ConferencePsychonmic Society’s 57th Annual Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityBoston
Period17/11/1620/11/16

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