Becoming cuckooed: conceptualising the relationship between disability, home takeovers and criminal exploitation

Stephen Macdonald *, Catherine Donovan, John Clayton, Marc Husband

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article explores the phenomenon whereby disabled people’s homes are being occupied (i.e. cuckooed) by local perpetrators and/or county lines organised criminal groups. This study employs a qualitative biographical methodology that collects data from disabled people who have been victimised this way and practitioners who have worked with them. The findings illustrate that social isolation, loneliness and a lack of community services can create a space where the exploitation of disabled people can flourish. We conclude by demonstrating that cuckooing predominantly occurs at a local level, perpetrated by local people, rather than by county lines organised criminal groups; that, in fact, local cuckooing can predate county lines takeovers.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages21
JournalDisability & Society
Early online date4 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 May 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Becoming cuckooed: conceptualising the relationship between disability, home takeovers and criminal exploitation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this