Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime

Daniel Jolley, Karen M Douglas, Ana C Leite, Tanya Schrader

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Belief in conspiracy theories is associated with negative outcomes such as political disengagement, prejudice, and environmental inaction. The current studies - one cross-sectional (N = 253) and one experimental (N = 120) - tested the hypothesis that belief in conspiracy theories would increase intentions to engage in everyday crime. Study 1 demonstrated that belief in conspiracy theories predicted everyday crime behaviours when controlling for other known predictors of everyday crime (e.g., Honesty-Humility). Study 2 demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories (vs. control) increased intentions to engage in everyday crime in the future, through an increased feeling of anomie. The perception that others have conspired may therefore in some contexts lead to negative action rather than inaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)534-549
Number of pages16
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume58
Issue number3
Early online date19 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019
Externally publishedYes

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