Body size and body esteem in women: The mediating role of possible self expectancy

Simon Dalley, Thomas Pollet, Jose Vidal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We predicted that an expectancy of acquiring a feared fat self and an expectancy of acquiring a hoped-for thin self both mediate the impact of body size on women's body esteem. We also predicted that the mediating pathway through the feared fat self would be stronger than that through the hoped-for thin self. A community sample of 251 women reported their age, height, weight, and completed measures of body esteem and expectancy perceptions of acquiring the feared fat and hoped-for thin selves. Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) demonstrated that expectancies about the feared fat self and about the hoped-for thin self mediated the relationship between body size and body esteem. Bayesian SEM also revealed that the pathway through the feared fat self was stronger than that through the hoped-for thin self. Implications for future research and the development of eating pathology are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)411-414
JournalBody Image
Volume10
Issue number3
Early online date8 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Body size and body esteem in women: The mediating role of possible self expectancy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this