Carnivalizing the future: a new approach to theorizing childhood and adulthood in science fiction for young readers

Kay Sambell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The comic narrative strategies that Reeve uses in Mortal Engines set it apart from the bulk of deeply serious, starkly pessimistic science fiction for young readers. Sambell illustrates how Reeve eschews the oppressive admonitory tone of the dystopian genre, by playfully and humorously carnivalising the future instead. She argues that this innovative approach allows him to critique and subvert the polluted adult world in a manner that is not at odds with the desire to offer young readers optimistic possibilities within the post-catastrophe novel. A new style of didacticism is achieved, based upon an emancipatory model of child-adult relations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)247-267
    JournalThe Lion and the Unicorn
    Volume28
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

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