CBT for people with intellectual disabilities : emerging evidence, cognitive ability and IQ effects

John Taylor, William Lindsay, Paul Willner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Historically people with intellectual disabilities have not been offered or received cognitive behavioural interventions that have been shown to be effective for mental health and emotional problems experienced by those without such disabilities. This is despite many people with intellectual disabilities having life experiences that potentially result in them having an increased risk to such problems. This paper discusses whether such therapeutic disdain is justified based on the evidence that is available and emerging concerning the application of cognitive behavioural interventions for this population. Issues concerning access to services, the ability of people with intellectual disabilities to engage in and benefit from the cognitive components of CBT, and the effect of cognitive abilities and IQ level on treatment effectiveness are explored in relation to this question.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)723-733
JournalBehavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'CBT for people with intellectual disabilities : emerging evidence, cognitive ability and IQ effects'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this