Civil Society Perspectives on Corruption and Human Rights: the case of Papua New Guinea

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Abstract

Drawing on data from the International State Crime Initiative's project "State Crime and Resistance: A Comparative Study on Civil Society" this chapter explores the definitional ambiguities surrounding corruption and its relationship to human rights. It shows that while Papua New Guinea notoriously experiences a great deal of unequivocally corrupt behaviour, the NGO activists interviewed expressed more concern about behaviour in the "grey area" between corruption and legitimate economic and political behaviour. It argues that the relations between economic and political power that threaten human rights are not limited to those conventionally defined as "corrupt".
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Routledge International Handbook of Criminology and Human Rights
EditorsLeanne Weber, Elaine Fishwick, Marinella Marmo
Place of PublicationAbingdon
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Pages169-179
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781138931176
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2016

Publication series

NameRoutledge International Handbooks
PublisherRoutledge

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