Climate change and disaster management

Geoff O'Brien, Phil O'Keefe, Joanne Rose, Ben Wisner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

258 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Climate change, although a natural phenomenon, is accelerated by human activities. Disaster policy response to climate change is dependent on a number of factors, such as readiness to accept the reality of climate change, institutions and capacity, as well as willingness to embed climate change risk assessment and management in development strategies. These conditions do not yet exist universally. A focus that neglects to enhance capacity-building and resilience as a prerequisite for managing climate change risks will, in all likelihood, do little to reduce vulnerability to those risks. Reducing vulnerability is a key aspect of reducing climate change risk. To do so requires a new approach to climate change risk and a change in institutional structures and relationships. A focus on development that neglects to enhance governance and resilience as a prerequisite for managing climate change risks will, in all likelihood, do little to reduce vulnerability to those risks.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-80
JournalDisasters
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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