Co-location as a catalyst for service innovation: a study of Scottish health and social care

Ally R. Memon, Tony Kinder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Academic literature and policy on co-location of local public services focus on the cost benefits. Other benefits and outcomes of co-location, including service innovations benefiting users, are under-conceptualized. This paper suggests a framework for evaluating co-location as a learning environment for innovation, drawing on new case studies of five Community Health Partnerships in Scotland charged with more closely coordinating health and social care. We conclude that partnerships using co-location are benefiting from additional service innovations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-405
Number of pages25
JournalPublic Management Review
Volume19
Issue number4
Early online date30 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Apr 2017
Externally publishedYes

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