Cold homes are associated with poor biomarkers and less blood pressure check-up: English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, 2012–2013

Ivy Shiue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

It has been known that outdoor temperature influences seasonal fluctuation of blood pressure and cholesterol levels, but the role of indoor temperature has been less studied. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the associations between indoor temperature and biomarkers in a countrywide and population-based setting. Data was retrieved from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, 2012–2013. Information on demographics, room temperature and a series of biomarkers measured in the blood and lung was obtained at household interviews. t test, chi-square test and a generalized linear model were performed cross-sectionally. Of 7997 older adults with the valid indoor temperature measurements, there were 1301 (16.3 %) people who resided in cold homes (
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7055-7059
JournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume23
Issue number7
Early online date13 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

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