Corporate Social Responsibility and Employee Attitudes: The Moderating Role of Employee Age

Richard Nyuur*, Daniel Ofori, Majoreen O. Amankwah, Kwame Amin Baffoe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on employee engagement and job satisfaction. Using 322 responses from employees of selected companies in Ghana, and employing hierarchical regression analysis, the study examines the direct impact of economic, legal, ethical and discretionary CSR practices on employee satisfaction and engagement in organisations. The study further explores the moderating role of employee age on the relationship between CSR and employee engagement and satisfaction. The results provide evidence that economic, legal, ethical and discretionary CSR practices influence higher employee engagement and satisfaction levels at work. However, the study finds no evidence of employee age moderating the association between each of the four CSR dimensions and employee job attitudes (engagement and satisfaction). These findings are insightful and provide a response to calls for research on these issues. The study contributes to the literature by demonstrating that ethical CSR practices strongly influence employees’ satisfaction and engagement levels; legal and discretionary CSR activities also have an influence, though to a lesser extent; and the economic dimension of CSR activities has the least impact. The managerial, practical and further research implications of these findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBusiness Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 25 Sep 2021

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