‘Daddy is a difficult word for me to hear’: carceral geographies of parenting and the prison visiting room as a contested space of situated fathering

Dominique Moran, Marie A. Hutton, Louise Dixon, Tom Disney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Advocating greater engagement between children’s and carceral geographies, this paper explores the spaces of parenting as they exist within a UK male prison, building upon criminological research on the effects of imprisonment on prisoners’ families and children. Focusing primarily on the visiting room, it extends discussion of the specificities of everyday material spaces and practices of parenting currently under scrutiny within children’s geographies and geographies of parenting, and brings these subdisciplines into dialogue with carceral geography. Concerned specifically with the intimate, embodied and sometimes banal practices of parenting in this constrained and highly surveilled context, it draws attention to previously overlooked spaces and identities of situated fathering.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-121
Number of pages15
JournalChildren's Geographies
Volume15
Issue number1
Early online date31 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

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