Disability and child sexual abuse: lessons from survivors' narratives for effective protection, prevention and treatment

Martina Higgins, John Swain

    Research output: Book/ReportBookpeer-review

    Abstract

    Disability and Child Sexual Abuse examines the ways in which society marginalises, institutionalises and places disabled children in situations of unacceptable risk, and how – as evidenced in the survivors' narratives – patterns of service delivery can contribute to the problem. Based on the accounts of seven disabled individuals who were sexually abused in childhood, the book highlights a wide range of pertinent issues. Through case vignettes and empirical research, the authors ask practitioners to scrutinise their current professional practice, exploring participants' experiences of hospitalisation, education systems and local authorities. They consider the issue of who abuses and why, and highlight issues relating to the complexities involved in revisiting past experiences and confronting unwarranted and unwanted feelings of responsibility. The difficulty of recounting the abuse narrative is also examined within the research context. This book will be relevant for professionals and students in the social, health and education services, such as social workers, teachers and counsellors. It will also offer insights for those seeking a less disablist society, including disabled people themselves.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationPhiladelphia
    PublisherJessica Kingsley
    Number of pages256
    ISBN (Print)978-1843105633
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Disability and child sexual abuse: lessons from survivors' narratives for effective protection, prevention and treatment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this