Display blindness? Looking again at the visibility of situated displays using eye tracking

Nick Dalton, Emily Collins, Paul Marshall

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)
10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Observational studies of situated displays have suggested that they are rarely looked at, and when they are it is typically only for a short period of time. Using a mobile eye tracker during a realistic shopping task in a shopping center, we show that people look at displays more than would be predicted from these observational studies, but still only short glances and often from quite far away. We characterize the patterns of eye-movements that precede looking at a display and discuss some of the design implications for the design of situated display technologies that are deployed in public space.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages3889-3898
ISBN (Print)9781450331456
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2015
Event33th International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015 -
Duration: 1 Apr 2015 → …

Conference

Conference33th International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015
Period1/04/15 → …

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