Does Charity Begin at Home? National Identity and Donating to Domestic versus International Charities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
43 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Despite the increased social significance currently attached to national identity, little is known about how national group attachment may correlate with the decision to donate to domestic versus international charities. The current study brings together literature on national identity and charitable giving to empirically validate a model of charitable ethnocentrism and cosmopolitanism. The substantive study is based on an online survey administered to a sample of 1004 UK respondents. The findings indicate that internationalism leads to an increased preference for international charities and a negative inclination towards domestic alternatives. Conversely, nationalism leads to a preference for domestic charities, but a surprisingly non-significant view on international causes. This study adds to the limited empirical research on charitable choice, specifically international giving, and has implications for fundraisers of both domestic and international charities. The work also provides valid and reliable scales for the assessment of charitable ethnocentrism and charitable cosmopolitanism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)865-880
JournalVoluntas
Volume30
Issue number4
Early online date15 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Does Charity Begin at Home? National Identity and Donating to Domestic versus International Charities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this