Ecological mechanisms of sedimental microbial biodiversity shift and the role of antimicrobial resistance genes in modulating microbial turnover

Okugbe Ebiotubo Ohore*, Yuwen Wang, Yunjie Wei, Edmond Sanganyado, Muhammad Shafiq, Xiaoyang Jiao, Amechi S. Nwankwegu, Wenhua Liu, Zhen Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanisms of phylogenetic turnover of microbial communities to environmental perturbations in sediments remain unclear. In this study, the molecular mechanisms of phylogenetic turnover, and impact of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) on the modification of microbial assemblages were unravelled. We investigated 306 ARGs, 8 transposases, and 4 integron integrases, bacteria, and eukaryotic diversity through high-throughput quantitative PCR and illumina sequencing, 21 antibiotics and 3 tetracycline byproducts. The freshwater and estuary ecosystems were mainly dominated by genus Sulfurovum and colonised by closely related species compared with the estuary (closeness centrality = 0.42 vs. 0.46), which was dominated by genus Mycobacterium. Eighty-six percent of the ecological process in the bacterial community was driven by stochastic processes, while the rest was driven by deterministic processes. Environmental-related concentrations of antibiotics (0.15–32.53 ng/g) stimulated the proliferation of ARGs which potentially modulated the microbial community assembly. ARG acquisition significantly (P < 0.001) increased eukaryotic diversity through protection mechanisms. ARGs showed complex interrelationships with the microbial communities, and phylum arthropods and Nematea demonstrated the strongest ARG acquisition potential. This study provides key insights for environmental policymakers into understanding the ecological impact of antibiotics and the role of ARGs in modulating the phylogenetic turnover of microbial communities and trophic transfer mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Article number116547
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume325
Issue numberPart A
Early online date27 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2023

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