Effects of acute consumption of fruit- and vegetable-juice shots on vasodilation and risk factors for CVD

Trevor George, Chutamat Niwat, Michael Gordon, Julie Lovegrove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

UK adults are advised to consume five 80 g portions of fruit and vegetables daily for the prevention of chronic diseases. However, despite these recommendations average consumption is less than three portions daily. Additionally, it is suggested that fruit juice should only count as one portion regardless of how much is consumed. This recommendation is based on the juicing process removing much of the fibre content of the fruit and vegetables and releasing more of the sugars present inside the cells. However, some of the beneficial effects of fruit and vegetables are accredited to compounds that are also present in many fruit juices, for example, vitamin C3 and polyphenolic compounds. Since 1974 the general consumption of vegetables has remained reasonably constant and there has been a modest increase in fruit consumption. However, the most marked observation has been the constant annual increase in fruit-juice consumption, from 30 g per capita per week in 1974 to 284 g per capita per week in 1999. Thus, these juice products may be a potential source of beneficial phytochemicals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61A
JournalProceedings of the Nutrition Society
Volume66
Issue numberOCA-B
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2007

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