Effects of strength training on the biomechanics and coordination of short-term maximal cycling

Louise Burnie, Paul Barratt, Keith Davids, Paul Worsfold, Jonathan Stephen Wheat*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
32 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The aim was to investigate the effects of a gym-based strength training intervention on biomechanics and intermuscular coordination patterns during short-term maximal cycling. Twelve track sprint cyclists performed 3 × 4 s seated sprints at 135 rpm, interspersed with 2 × 4 s seated sprints at 60 rpm on an isokinetic ergometer, repeating the session 11.6 ± 1.4 weeks later following a training programme that included two gym-based strength training sessions per week. Joint moments were calculated via inverse dynamics, using pedal forces and limb kinematics. EMG activity was measured for 9 lower limb muscles. Track cyclists ‘leg strength” increased (7.6 ± 11.9 kg, P = 0.050 and ES = 0.26) following the strength training intervention. This was accompanied by a significant increase in crank power over a complete revolution for sprints at 135 rpm (26.5 ± 36.2 W, P = 0.028 and ES = 0.29). The increase in leg strength and average crank power was associated with a change in biceps femoris muscle activity, indicating that the riders successfully adapted their intermuscular coordination patterns to accommodate the changes in personal constraints to increase crank power.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1315-1324
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume40
Issue number12
Early online date28 Jun 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

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