Evaluating an evidence-based online screening tool to identify learning disability

Karen McKenzie*, Aja Murray, Judith Thompson, Karen Horridge, Kris McCarty

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

EVIDENCE AND PRACTICE
Evaluating an evidence-based online screening tool to identify learning disability
Karen McKenzie Professor of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England
Aja Murray Lecturer in Psychology, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland
Judith Thompson Network Chair, North East and Cumbria Learning Disability Network, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England
Karen Horridge Consultant Paediatrician (disability), South Tyneside and Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust, South Shields, England
Kristofor McCarty Senior Lecturer, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England
Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to TwitterShare to TwitterMore...0
Why you should read this article:
To learn how people with a learning disability continue to experience significant health inequalities

To understand how many people’s learning disability goes unrecognised

To familiarise yourself with the Child and Adolescent Intellectual Disability Questionnaire

Background Many people with a learning disability are unable to benefit from health improvement measures because their learning disability is unrecognised. Screening tools such as the Child and Adolescent Intellectual Disability Screening Questionnaire (CAIDS-Q) can assist with the identification of learning disability.

Aim To explore whether the use of a new online version of the CAIDS-Q to identify whether or not an individual was likely to have a learning disability was consistent with reported learning disability as identified previously by a healthcare or education professional.

Methods Anonymous data from people who used the online CAIDS-Q in the first weeks of the launch were collated and analysed.

Results Of the 159 people who used the online CAIDS-Q, 126 (79%) were family members and/or carers of the person being screened and 31 (19%) were professionals (predominantly healthcare and education professionals). Of the 52 people who had been identified previously as having a learning disability, 47 (90%) were correctly identified as such by the CAIDS-Q score.

Conclusion The CAIDS-Q online screening tool for learning disability can be used by professionals and parents. It correctly identified 90% of people who had previously been identified as having a learning disability. The accuracy of the online version of the CAIDS-Q is similar to hard copy versions, which suggests that it may be an accurate tool that can assist with the identification of people with a learning disability.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalLearning Disability Practice
Early online date19 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Nov 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluating an evidence-based online screening tool to identify learning disability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this