Experience sampling method and the everyday experiences of adults with intellectual disability: A feasibility study

Nathan J. Wilson*, Yu Wei Chen, Natasha Mahoney, Angus Buchanan, Anne Marks, Reinie Cordier

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Experiences of people with intellectual disability are often reported by proxy, excluding the person's own perception. To assist people with intellectual disabilities ability to communicate their own experiences, the current study explored the feasibility, reliability and validity of experience sampling methods (ESMs) for people with intellectual disability. 

Method: After a training session, 19 participants carried a mobile device for 7 consecutive days, answering a survey when prompted 7 times daily. Participants were interviewed at the end of data collection. 

Results: Excluding incomplete entries, the response rate was 33.8%, varying by living arrangement and employment. Split-half reliability and correlations among logically linked internal experiences demonstrated strong reliability and validity. Illustration of the context of responses supported face validity. Technological and content difficulties were discussed in interviews. 

Conclusions: Experience sampling methods is feasible for some people with intellectual disability, providing valid and reliable information. Future research is needed to further improve feasibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1328-1339
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume33
Issue number6
Early online date31 May 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2020

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