Experiences of Visually Impaired and Blind Students in UK Higher Education: An Exploration of Access and Participation

Emma Croft*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Drawing on a small scale doctoral research project that engaged a critical disability studies (CDS) lens and is rooted in a Grounded Theory methodological approach, this paper explores the experiences of visually impaired and blind students regarding their access and negotiation of inclusion within UK higher education (HE). The emergent research findings, which here focus on the process and practical application of Disabled Student’s Allowance, accommodation within student living and, more broadly, social interactions within HE, reveal a liminal and bounded participation contrary to the ongoing processes and practices, within HE, which purport equity and inclusion.

By foregrounding the voices of these visually impaired students, whilst expanding upon existing understanding of the experiences of disabled students, the important discussions of day-to-day social interactions and identity as a visually impaired person and student reveal an important juxtaposition between the rhetoric of inclusion and individual experience.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)382-392
Number of pages11
JournalScandinavian Journal of Disability Research
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Dec 2020

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