Fat talk is predicted by body dissatisfaction and social comparison with no interaction effect: Evidence from two replication studies

Thomas V. Pollet*, Sarah Dawson, Martin J. Tovée, Piers L. Cornelissen, Katri K. Cornelissen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Verbal denigration of personal body size and shape (“fat talk”) is correlated with, and can have a causal influence on body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. What is less clear is who is most likely to fat talk. To address this, Corning and Gondoli (2012) conducted a study confirming that a woman's body dissatisfaction directly predicted their fat talk. But this effect was scaled so that the likelihood of engaging in fat talk intensified if she had a stronger tendency to socially compare: the relationship was multiplicative. Here, we carried out two replications of Corning and Gondoli's (2012) study, the first with 189 UK participants and the second with 371 US participants. We found that multiple regression models predicting fat talk showed additive, but not multiplicative relationships. A robust Bayesian meta-analysis combining the results of our two studies with the results of the original study confirmed this. In conclusion, these studies show an additive relationship between fat talk and social comparison on fat talk.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)317-324
JournalBody Image
Volume38
Early online date1 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fat talk is predicted by body dissatisfaction and social comparison with no interaction effect: Evidence from two replication studies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this