Functional behaviour of spinal muscles after training with an exercise device developed to recruit and train postural muscles

Tobias Weber, Sauro E. Salomoni, Dorothée Debuse, François Hug, Nick Caplan, Enrico De Martino, Jonathan Scott, Julie Hides, Paul Hodges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of a single exercise session using a device developed for postural muscle training on the function of postural muscles in healthy, pain free individuals. During standardised rapid arm movements, timing of onset of electromyography (EMG) was measured using intramuscular and surface recordings of the transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus abdominis (OI), obliquus externus abdominis (OE), lumbar multifidus (LM) and lumbar erector spinae (LES) muscles. A single exercise session with the device led to significantly (main effect of time: P = 0.03) earlier LES EMG onset in advance of the postural perturbation induced by rapid forward arm movements from -1 ms (SD: 32 ms) at baseline to -11 ms (SD: 27 ms) post-exercise and -16 ms (SD: 22 ms) at 10-min Wash-Out after the FRED exercise bout. The timing of EMG onset of the other trunk muscles was not affected by the single bout of exercise. A significant correlation was found between background activity and the EMG onset times of of TrA (r = 0.6; P < 0.001), OI (r = 0.59; P < 0.001), LES (r = 0.32; P = 0.046) and LMs (r = 0.77; P < 0.001). Higher levels of trunk muscle background activity were associated with later onset times. The present findings suggest that a single exposure to the postural training device can induce small changes in spinal muscle function in healthy pain free individuals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-193
JournalGait and Posture
Volume66
Early online date2 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

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