Gaze aversion as a cognitive load management strategy in autism spectrum disorder and Williams syndrome

Gwyneth Doherty-Sneddon, Deborah Riby, Lisa Whittle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

During face-to-face questioning typically developing children and adults use gaze aversion (GA), away from their questioner, when thinking. GA increases with question difficulty and improves the accuracy of responses. This is the first study to investigate whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; associated with reduced sociability and atypical face gaze) and Williams syndrome (WS; associated with hypersociability and atypical face gaze) use GA to manage cognitive load during face-to-face interactions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)420-430
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2012

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