Grease to the wheel or a spanner in the works? An investigation of office and industrial occupier displacement and property market filtering in Tyne & Wear using the chaining technique

Paul Greenhalgh, Mike Barke, Mary-Lou Downie, Peter Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The research uses a chaining technique to study the scale and impact of the displacement of office and industrial occupiers in the Tyne and Wear conurbation. The status and origin of occupiers of 20 office and industrial developments, promoted or assisted by the public sector, have been recorded to determine the distance that they have moved and the number of net new jobs generated. Property chaining reveals the extent to which the filtering effect has resulted in reoccupation of buildings and permits the quantification of the amount of property remaining vacant and its location. Analysis of the recorded chains has revealed that more than half of all occupiers on assisted schemes have relocated within the Tyne and Wear area and one in three occupier chains generated by such relocations result in vacant property elsewhere within the metropolitan area. The displacement of employment and economic activity within the conurbation can be mapped and could be used to inform the action of public agencies to reduce or ameliorate the negative side-effects of their intervention. The chaining technique proves an elegantly simple and robust technique by which to determine the scale and distribution of occupier displacement in property markets.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-394
JournalRegional Studies
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003

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