Health and social care staff responses to working with people with a learning disability who display sexual offending type behaviours

Karen McKenzie, Edith Matheson, Kerry McKaskie, Shona Patrick, Donna Paxton, Amanda Michie, George Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study found that 59% of social care staff were currently supporting a client with a learning disability who had offended or displayed an offending type behaviour. The range of behaviours was similar to that displayed by clients in a secure health facility and included rape, sexual assault and exposure. Only 22.9% of social care staff had received training in this area, while none of the health stuff had. Both groups expressed low levels of confidence in supporting this client group. The areas of difficulty were common to both groups and included personal attitudes and attitudes of others to the behaviour, and concern over risk, responsibility and safety. In respect of attitudes, social care staff were found to be significantly more likely to hold negative attitudes towards the person's behaviour, while health staff were significantly more likely to feel negatively towards the person. Health staff were significantly more likely to identify training as a means of further support, while social care staff identified professional input. Both groups identified the need for theoretical training about working with this client group. Despite this no significant differences were found between those who had and had not received training and confidence, attitudes and the need for further support.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-66
JournalJournal of Sexual Aggression
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

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