Historical frames and the politics of humanitarian intervention: from Ethiopia, Somalia to Rwanda

Ibrahim Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article argues that historical frames we often find in news media discourse can skew the way we perceive distant wars, and that this can have a knock‐on effect on international humanitarian response within a cosmopolitan framework of global justice. Drawing on an empirical exploration of recent ‘humanitarian interventions’ in Ethiopia, Somalia and Rwanda, the article shows how historical frames largely reinforced the elite‐dominated news frames of ‘their crisis’, and ‘not ours’, which explains the delayed international intervention to end it. I conclude that the non‐intervention, or delayed intervention, of the international community on humanitarian grounds to end these crises was informed more by historical empathy/distance frames than empathy/critical frames in the mainstream Western news media discourse.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-371
JournalGlobalisation Societies and Education
Volume5
Issue number3
Early online date25 Oct 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2007

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Historical frames and the politics of humanitarian intervention: from Ethiopia, Somalia to Rwanda'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this