Ice-shelf basal morphology from an upward-looking multibeam system deployed from an autonomous underwater vehicle

Pierre Dutrieux, Adrian Jenkins, Keith Nicholls

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

The huge cavities beneath floating Antarctic ice shelves have only been explored recently by autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Oceanic waters above the in situ freezing point melt those faces of marine-terminating glaciers and ice shelves with which they come into contact. This, in turn, impacts the dynamics of ice sheets as the reduction in buttressing allows the ice to flow faster into the ocean, increasing their contribution to eustatic sea-level rise (Shepherd et al. 2012). Pine Island Glacier (PIG) in West Antarctica (Fig. 1a, d) is an example, and has been accelerating and thinning over past decades, and still appears to be in retreat. This is driven by unpinning from a seabed ridge and exposure to high ocean temperatures of up to 1°C at the grounding line (Jenkins et al. 2010) that are subject to climatically forced variability (Dutrieux et al. 2014a).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAtlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms
Subtitle of host publicationModern, Quaternary and Ancient
EditorsJulian A. Dowdeswell, Miquel Canals, Martin Jakobsson, Brian J. Todd, Evelyn K. Dowdeswell, Kelly A. Hogan
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherGeological Society of London
Pages219-220
ISBN (Print)9781786202680
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameGeological Society, London, Memoirs
PublisherGeological Society of London
Number1
Volume46
ISSN (Print)0435-4052
ISSN (Electronic)2041-4722

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