Impact of increasing doses of flavonoid-rich and flavonoid-poor fruits and vegetables on vascular reactivity in an ‘at risk’ group: findings from the FLAVURS study

Trevor George, Mary Foong-Fong Chong, Michael Gordon, Anne-Marie Minihane, Orla Kennedy, Jeremy Spencer, Julie Lovegrove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

CVD is responsible for 48% of all deaths each year in Europe. Endothelial cell dysfunction is key in early stage development of atherosclerosis leading to CVD. Vascular reactivity and arterial stiffness measured in vivo can be used as markers for general vascular dysfunction. Epidemiological studies indicate that diets rich in fruits and vegetables (F&V) are associated with reduced risk of CVD. However, the relationship between the type and amount of F&V consumed and CVD risk reduction has not been established. Increasing evidence suggests that dietary flavonoids may explain some of the CVD benefits of increased F&V intake. However, this hypothesis had not previously been tested in an adequately powered, dose-response dietary intervention trial.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E233
JournalProceedings of the Nutrition Society
Volume70
Issue numberOCE4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

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