Impacts of motion-based technology on balance, movement confidence, and cognitive function among people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment: Protocol for a quasi-experimental pre- And posttest study

Erica Dove*, Rosalie Wang, Karl Zabjek, Arlene Astell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: While exercise can benefit the health and well-being of people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment, many exercise programs offered to this population are passive, unengaging, and inaccessible, resulting in poor adherence. Motion-based technologies are increasingly being explored to encourage exercise participation among people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. However, the impacts of using motion-based technologies with people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment on variables including balance, movement confidence, and cognitive function have yet to be determined. Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the impacts of a group motion-based technology intervention on balance, movement confidence, and cognitive function among people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. Methods: In this quasi-experimental pre- and posttest design, we will recruit 24 people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment from 4 adult day programs and invite them to play Xbox Kinect bowling in a group setting, twice weekly for 10 weeks. We will require participants to speak and understand English, be without visual impairment, and be able to stand and walk. At pretest, participants will complete the Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). We will video record participants during weeks 1, 5, and 10 of the intervention to capture behavioral indicators of movement confidence (eg, fluency of motion) through coding. At posttest, the Mini-BESTest and MoCA will be repeated. We will analyze quantitative data collected through the Mini-BESTest and the MoCA using an intent-to-treat analysis, with study site and number of intervention sessions attended as covariates. To analyze the videos, we will extract count and percentage data from the coded recordings. Results: This study will address the question of whether a group motion-based technology intervention, delivered in an adult day program context, has the potential to impact balance, movement confidence, and cognitive function among people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. The project was funded in 2019 and enrollment was completed on February 28, 2020. Data analysis is underway and the first results are expected to be submitted for publication in 2021. Conclusions: This study will assess the feasibility and potential benefits of using motion-based technology to deliver exercise interventions to people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. This work can also be used as the basis for developing specific software and future exercise programs using motion-based technology for people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment, as well as understanding some of the conditions in which these programs can be delivered.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere18209
JournalJMIR Research Protocols
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2020
Externally publishedYes

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