Implications of spirituality and Islamic Shari’a law for workers’ well-being in luxury hotels: a eudaimonic view

Tamer Koburtay, AbedElkareem Alzoubi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores the extent to which luxury hotels operating in Jordan (Dead Sea) follow Islamic Shari’a law and offer spiritual facilities, and it aims to understand how this obligation (or otherwise) may enhance or adversely affect employees’ psychological well-being (PWB). This article draws on Ryff’s theory of PWB and Stephenson’s model of Islamic-spiritual hotels. Eighteen managers who were working in five-star hotels participated in this study, which follows a qualitative-inductive method. The results show that five-star hotels operating in Jordan (Dead Sea) do not adhere to the Islamic guidelines with the exception of serving halal food and not allowing gambling machines. However, they offer spiritual facilities for workers, and these facilities enhance Ryff’s six dimensions of well-being for workers. The findings show that compliance with Islamic Shari’a law and the availability of spiritual facilities enhance workers’ PWB. The importance of this article lies in presenting a fresh understanding of the linkages between spirituality in the workplace and employees’ PWB.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-182
Number of pages24
JournalHospitality and Society
Volume11
Issue number2
Early online date1 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

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