Improvement in hemodynamic responses to metaboreflex activation after one year of training in spinal cord injured humans

Raffaele Milia, Silvana Roberto, Elisabetta Marongiu, Sergio Olla, Irene Sanna, Luca Angius, Pierpaolo Bassareo, Marco Pinna, Filippo Tocco, Alberto Concu, Antonio Crisafulli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals show an altered hemodynamic response to metaboreflex activation due to a reduced capacity to vasoconstrict the venous and arterial vessels below the level of the lesion. Exercise training was found to enhance circulating catecholamines and to improve cardiac preload and venous tone in response to exercise in SCI subjects. Therefore, training would result in enhanced diastolic function and capacity to vasoconstrict circulation. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that one year of training improves hemodynamic response to metaboreflex activation in these subjects. Nine SCI individuals were enrolled and underwent a metaboreflex activation test at the beginning of the study (T0) and after one year of training (T1). Hemodynamics were assessed by impedance cardiography and echocardiography at both T0 and T1. Results show that there was an increment in cardiac output response due to metaboreflex activity at T1 as compared to T0 (545.4 ± 683.9 mL · min(-1) versus 220.5 ± 745.4 mL · min(-1), P < 0.05). Moreover, ventricular filling rate response was higher at T1 than at T0. Similarly, end-diastolic volume response was increased after training. We concluded that a period of training can successfully improve hemodynamic response to muscle metaboreflex activation in SCI subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number893468
Number of pages10
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2014
Early online date7 Apr 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Improvement in hemodynamic responses to metaboreflex activation after one year of training in spinal cord injured humans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this