Informative art: Information visualization in everyday environments

Lars Erik Holmquist, Tobias Skog

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thanks to advances in display technologies, it will soon be possible to have electronic information displays virtually everywhere. We have developed the concept of Informative Art as a way to integrate information visualization in the everyday human environment. Informative Art combines a dynamically updated information display with the decorative role of visual art, such as posters and paintings. We present four examples of Informative Art, where we borrowed the styles of various modern artists to show different kinds of information. For instance, a composition similar to the style of an abstract painter, Piet Mondriaan, showed the current weather in six different cities, while a piece of "landscape art" in the style of Richard Long gave a view of the last 30 days of global earthquake activity. We discuss how designing information visualizations for everyday environment introduces requirement that are different from those of graphical user interfaces for desktop computers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 1st International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Australasia and South East Asia, GRAPHITE '03
PublisherACM
Pages229-235
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9781581135787
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2003
Externally publishedYes
Event1st International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Australasia and South East Asia, GRAPHITE '03 - Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Duration: 11 Feb 200314 Feb 2003

Conference

Conference1st International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Australasia and South East Asia, GRAPHITE '03
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne, VIC
Period11/02/0314/02/03

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